Does This Boot Fit?

August 13, 2015

Four things that assure your Boot fits correctly:

  1. The instep (vamp) should fit snug over the top of your foot’s arch.  It’s normal for it to take some effort to get your foot all the way in when the boot is new.  Leather stretches and conforms to your foot with wearing.  (TIP:  If your socks are damp from the shoes you’ve been wearing it will be even more difficult to get into the boot…so  use dry socks to try your boot on, or sprinkle some talcum powder on the inside of the boot to help it slip on.)
  2. The ball of your foot (the widest part) should sit at the widest part of the boot.  (TIP:  Boots are fitted according to location of the ball of your foot. Shoes are sized according to toe length.)
  3. It’s normal for your heels to slip at first.  After you walk around a bit, the sole flexes and the slipping will stop.  (TIP: If there’s no slipping at first, you probably need a larger size, either wider or longer.)
  4. Always try on both boots.  Everyone has one foot that’s larger than the other one.  (TIP: Fit your larger foot! And remember your feet are sometimes a little swollen by the end of a long day, so factor this in when determining fit.)



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